Saturday, May 14, 2011

Angelman Syndrome Causes Risk factors

What is Angelman Syndrome?

Angelman syndrome is a genetic disorder that causes developmental delay and neurological problems. The physician Harry Angelman first delineated the syndrome in 1965, when he described several children in his practice as having "flat heads, jerky movements, protruding tongues, and bouts of laughter." Infants with Angelman syndrome appear normal at birth, but often have feeding problems in the first months of life and exhibit noticeable developmental delays by 6 to 12 months. Seizures often begin between 2 and 3 years of age. Speech impairment is pronounced, with little to no use of words. Individuals with this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause severe functional deficits. Angelman syndrome results from absence of a functional copy of the UBE3A gene inherited from the mother.

Is there any treatment?

There is no specific therapy for Angelman syndrome. Medical therapy for seizures is usually necessary. Physical and occupational therapies, communication therapy, and behavioral therapies are important in allowing individuals with Angelman syndrome to reach their maximum developmental potential.

What is the prognosis?

Most individuals with Angelman syndrome will have severe developmental delays, speech limitations, and motor difficulties. However, individuals with Angelman syndrome can have normal life spans and generally do not show developmental regression as they age. Early diagnosis and tailored interventions and therapies help improve quality of life.

What research is being done?

The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Angelman syndrome, to develop techniques to diagnose, treat, prevent, and ultimately cure them.

Risk factors

Angelman syndrome is rare. In most cases, researchers don't know what causes the genetic changes that result in Angelman syndrome. Most people with Angelman syndrome don't have a family history of the disease. In a small percentage of cases, however, Angelman syndrome may be inherited from a parent, so a family history of the disease may increase a baby's risk of developing Angelman syndrome.

Angelman Syndrome Foundation
3015 E. New York Street Suite A2265
Aurora, IL 60504
Tel: 630-978-4245
Fax: 630-978-7408

The Arc of the United States
1010 Wayne Avenue Suite 650
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Tel: 301-565-3842
Fax: 301-565-3843 or -5342

SOURCE: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


Post a Comment